Question: Is It Good To Talk To The Police?

Can the police make you talk to them?

Police can ask you to accompany them to a police station for questioning, but you are not required to go unless you have been arrested for an offence.

You should speak to a lawyer before you speak to the police.

Legal Aid NSW does not provide lawyers for this purpose..

Can police refuse interview?

It is really important to remember that you have a right to refuse to do a police interview. … Your right to silence is found under s89 of the Evidence Act NSW 1995. It is the law. You can tell police that you do not want to be interviewed.

Will police tell who called them?

No. First and foremost, they probably don’t know who called. Police are dispatched to calls. They receive an address, the complaint, and relevant information about the complaint.

Can I refuse to talk to a detective?

If the detective does not have enough evidence to charge the person with a crime, then the person can refuse to talk to the detective and the detective still does not have enough to charge them with a crime. They have not made their position worse by not talking to the detective.

How long is a police interview?

How long does the police interview go for? An interview can go for a number of hours. If it is a “no comment” interview it will be much shorter and is often over within 10 – 20 minutes. The police will often leave you waiting for a long time prior to interviewing you.

Why do you say no comment in a police interview?

But it may harm your defence if you do not mention, when questioned, something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence. … Today, courts can use silence (or no comment answers) as an inference of guilt. This means that saying nothing, in some cases, can do more harm than good.

Can you refuse to talk to police?

Even if the Police ask you a direct question, you have a right to not answer it. You are not obliged to say anything. If you do not want to answer questions, you should tell the Police outright that you do not wish to be interviewed at all. The police cannot say that you are guilty because you will not talk to them.

How do you talk to a cop?

Stay calm and in control of your words and actions. Avoid arguing with the police but firmly assert your rights. Never run of physically resist even if you think that the stop is unreasonable or unlawful. Ask if you are free to leave; if they say yes, do so.

Why do police ask for voluntary interviews?

Voluntary interviews can take place in relation to historical sexual abuse, rape or fraud allegations. The police often invite young, mentally disordered or vulnerable suspects to attend as a volunteer if they are to be interviewed.

Why you should never talk to the police?

Talking to the police CANNOT help you, EVER: Police want to talk to you because they suspect you have committed a crime. If you are detained, they already have enough evidence to arrest you and they want to see if you will admit it and provide them with a stronger case against you.

Why do the police want to talk to me?

The police already believe that you are guilty – that’s why they want to talk to you. They believe you’ve committed a crime, and they want to get you to state that. People believe that if they tell their side of the story it will be over – The police are not going to believe you, and talking will not end things.

Should you never talk to the police without a lawyer?

You should never talk to the police without first consulting an attorney. Police officers are trained to obtain confessions, admissions and inconsistencies. If you are innocent, they will use inconsistencies in your statements as evidence of guilt.

What happens if you call the cops for no reason?

Calling 911 for any purpose other than to report a true emergency could result in criminal penalties. Each state has different punishments for 911 misuse, but in the worst cases, abuse can lead to jail time and stiff fines.

What is the Garrity Law?

The basic premise of the Garrity protection is straightforward: First, an Officer cannot be compelled, by the threat of serious discipline, to make statements that may be used in a subsequent criminal proceeding; second, an Officer cannot be terminated for refusing to waive his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent.